Page 11

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Title
Page 11
Source
Semi-tropical Nevada
Is Part Of
http://digital.library.unlv.edu/u?/dig,8
Full text
—11 — wells followed in rapid succession, and the value of Las Vegas Valley land was established beyond a doubt. There are now in the neighborhood of one hundred and twenty artesian wells in the Valley, The others measure from three to 20 inches. This only the beginning. By the time this booklet is printed and distributed more wells will have been developed. Las Vegas artesian water is as pure and sweet as any water in the world, without a trace of unpleasant or injurious minerals. A COUNTRY THAT IS ALWAYS "LETTING OUT ITS BELT." The artesian belt is known to be fourteen or fifteen miles long, and three to five miles wide, and these limits are being constantly extended into hitherto unproved territory. Anywhere within this belt flowing water can be secured with absolute certainty. There is, of course, no predicting the amount. It may be enough for five acres, and it may be enough for 300, but whether large or small, it is worth much more than it costs. We know of districts whose climate and products are almost identical with ours, in which such flows as come from our smallest wells, secured at twice their depth, are considered good enough to serve as the basis of an extensive advertising campaign. Artesian Water in the Las Vegas Valley is struck at depths varying from 90 to 500 feet generally in three distinct flows, the lower stratum of water-bearing gravel lying at about 400 feet, which is, naturally, the average depth of the best wells. There is some debate as to

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