Page 9

Metadata

Title
Page 9
Source
Colorado River problem
Is Part Of
http://digital.library.unlv.edu/u?/dig,8
Full text
THE COLORADO RIVER PROBLEM 313 cut-off channel. This new levee now constitutes the main line of defense. No alarm is now felt for the levee of the California Development Company from the intake down to the Ockerson Levee, because, in its present condition, except during Gila floods, the river never gets over its banks along this stretch. Even if the levee were breached, as it was in 1914 and again in 1916, there would be no now into the valley. If the new levee should fail, however, the river would return to Volcano Lake and again threaten the Valley with inundation over the Volcano Lake Levee. The new levee is a substantial structure with a railroad throughout its full length and rock revetment on the river side. During the long flood season, however, the ground under and on both sides of the levee becomes saturated and softened so that, if the river in its meanders should start a, direct attack, the levee might fail by undercutting in spite of all efforts to save it. Between $6,000,000 and $7,000 000 has been spent on the flood protection of Imperial Valley, of which amount the Southern Pacific Railroad Company has paid about $2,300,000 and the Federal Government, $1,100,000. (See Table 1.) The annual maintenance is said to be from $200,000 to $600,000. A study of the reports on flood protection of the Imperial Valley shows that the engineers engaged on the work have never been alarmed over the danger of serious inundation of the Valley since the river was shut out in 1907. In this connection attention is invited to the papers by H. T. Cory,* M. Am. Soc. C. E., who closed the gap in 1907, J. C. Allison,† M. Am. Soc. C. E., and by S. L. Rothery,‡ Assoc. M. Am. Soc. C. E. Whatever its justification, the fear of permanent inundation has grown to such an extent as to affect the ability of the Imperial District to finance and has resulted in an appeal to the Federal Government which was answered by the Act of May 18, 1920, and the "Swing-Johnson" bill. The District has contributed about $155,000 for the investigations made under the Act of 1920. Table 1 shows the expenditures that have been made for river control below Laguna Dam. During the past 6 years, the annual expenditures charged to maintenance§ have been as follows: 1918.................................. $ 65,789 1919.................................. 73,471 1920................................. 86,609 1921.................................. 122,958 1922.................................. 74,854 1923.................................. 94,835 _________ Total.......................... $518,516 Average ................... $ 86,420 ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ * "Irrigation and River Control in the Colorado River Delta", Transactions, Am. Soc. C. B., Vol. LXXVI (1913), p. 1204. † "Control of the Colorado River as Related to the Protection of Imperial Valley", Transactions, Am. Soc. C. E., Vol. LXXXI (1917), p. 297. ‡ "A River Diversion on the Delta of the Colorado in Relation to Imperial Valley, California", Transactions, Am. Soc. C, E., Vol. LXXXVI (1923), p. 1412. § Applies only to maintenance of levees on the Yuma Project.

Cite this Item

When linking to this object, please use the following URL:

http://digital.library.unlv.edu/u?/lv_water,1620

Tags

Comments

Subscribe to recent comments

There are no comments yet. Be the first to comment below!

Comment on this object