Page 25

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Title
Page 25
Source
Colorado River problem
Is Part Of
http://digital.library.unlv.edu/u?/dig,8
Full text
328 THE COLORADO RIVER PROBLEM sions. These results check the accuracy of the method so far as it can be tested directly and indicate that it is fairly reliable as an indicator of mean discharge for periods of 5 years or more. "The discharge of the Colorado as estimated for the period 1878-1922 at the diversion for the Yuma Project is given in following table [Table 5], in millions of acre-feet. "The following table [Table 6], shows the mean discharge for various periods for Colorado River, Great Salt Lake, and Salt River, based on mean discharge for the period 1902-1922, the period of discharge records on Colorado River, all on the assumption that conditions of development were the same as in 1922 throughout the periods considered. "The comparison here afforded tends to increase materially the confidence with which the estimated discharge prior to 1902 may be used. "Effect of Storage on Water Supply "Studies of water supply indicate that under conditions of development as in 1922, the water supply likely to reach Laguna Dam varies from about 6,000,000 to about 27,000,000 acre-ft. a year, and it is not unlikely that these limits may be exceeded in both directions. The mean flow (1922 conditions and equivalent flow at Laguna) for a period of 45 years, 1878-1922, is between 13,000,000 and 14,000,000 acre-ft. For periods of as much as or more than 20 years, however, the flow may be less than 11,000,000 or more than 16,000,000 acre-ft. "TABLE 5.—Estimated Discharge of Colorado River at Laguna with 1922 Conditions of Development. (Millions of Acre-Feet.) Year. Discharge. Year. Discharge. Year. Discharge. 1878 13.0 1893 11.7 1908 11.7 1879 8.7 1894 8.8 1909 24.6 1880 13.6 1895 9.4 1910 13.3 1881 11.2 1896 7.7 1911 16.8 1882 8.6 1897 10.2 1912 17.5 1883 14.0 1898 7.7 1913 11.5 1884 27.2 1899 14.0 1914 20.1 1885 15.3 1900 10.1 1915 12.6 1886 11.5 1901 14.2 1916 18.7 1887 9.1 1902 6.0 1917 19.6 1888 8.3 1903 10.3 1918 13.0 1889 9.4 1904 9.0 1919 10.3 1890 14.5 1905 14.9 1920 21.1 1891 12.9 1906 16.6 1921 19.5 1892 14.4 1907 23.9 1922 16.9 Mean 13.6 "Irrigation and power requirements both would be best served if the annual flow were made substantially uniform. The following tables [Tables 7, 8, 9, and 10], indicate what may be accomplished in this regard with specified amounts of storage capacity under the assumption that the storage reservoir or reservoirs would be full or, if of sufficient capacity, would contain 10,000,000 acre-ft. at the beginning of the 45-year period considered. The tables show the amount of water in storage each year, evaporation throughout being assumed to be 3% of the amount of water in storage. An empty reservoir and shortage in available water supply is indicated by parentheses and minus sign.

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