Page 65

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Title
Page 65
Source
Colorado River problem
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http://digital.library.unlv.edu/u?/dig,8
Full text
370 ALLISON ON THE COLORADO RIVER PROBLEM it reaches the upper portion of the Line, or the irrigable area on the East Side Mesa in the United States, is a similar example. The tax rate on the American side for the four years under discussion is, as follows: $1.67 in 1919; $2.35 in 1920; $1.85 in 1921; and $1.90 in 1922; or an average of $1.95. Should there be wiped out the revenues collected in advance from Mexico for the four years, in the total sum of $1,670,153.63, then the tax rate per acre to the American land and property owner would be nearly doubled. In the studies which have been made of the entire question, the relationship of capital investment between Mexico and the United States has also been investigated. In the building of the canal and levee systems there has been constructed and utilized for the benefit of American lands, a total of 67 miles of canal and 55 miles of levee on the properties of the Colorado River Land Company, S. A., alone, totaling an acreage right of way (exclusive of lands lost by seepage damage, etc.) of 30,000 acres. This taken with the right of way occupied on the remainder of the Mexican lands other than those of the Colorado River Land Company, brings the total usage of property up to 50,000 acres, which, at $50 per acre, has a total capital value of $2,500,000, equivalent to more than Mexico's proportion of the bonded debt of the Imperial Irrigation District. Table 25 is a summary taken from the figures furnished by the Imperial Irrigation District showing the over-payment by Mexico of its share of expenses for 1923. Summarizing, the actual amount of money expended to deliver water to the International Boundary Line, at the various points of diversion into the United States, for agricultural use, is as follows: All diversion works at Hanlon Heading, etc........... $122,095.78 All costs of delivering Mexican water, and carrying American water through Mexico.................... 185,986.50 All river protective work of every nature.............. 197,966.68 Total cost to the Irrigation District to deliver water at the various canal points along the International Boundary Line for usage in the United States, and to deliver Mexican water.......................... $506,048.96 . Total water sales in Mexico.......................... $526,971.56 Difference between money received from Mexico and total monies expended by the District.............. $20,922.60 Plus cash paid by the Colorado River Land Company for river protective work, not included in the above ........................................ $39,855.65 Total net profit to the Imperial Irrigation District, after delivering all Mexican water, and delivering American water to the various canals at the International Boundary Line................................... $60,778.25

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