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page 13
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http://digital.library.unlv.edu/u?/dig,8
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Rainfall, in inches, at 10 stations in California. Mean annual.(a) Years included. Amount. Annual 1903.(b) Annual 1904.(c) Annual 1905.(d) Bagdad........................................... Barstow.......................................... Bishop........................................... Imperial......................................... Indio............................................. Keeler............................................. Mohave..................................... Needles..........................................Palm Springs..................................... Volcano.......................................... 1884-1900 1878-1900 1884-1900 1877-1900 1892-1900 1889-1900 1889-1900 4.27 2.43 2.76 4.79 2.79 3.53 1.70 2.32 2.65 1.56 0.34 0.10 1.87 0.70 0.20 2.30 0.80 7.61 3.50 2.86 1.24 1.90 9.90 6.40 5.19 10.06 6.80 6.45 11.36 9.36 6.18 (a)Monthly Weather Review, vol. 30, No. 4, April, 1902, pp. 208-209. (b) California section of the Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau, Annual Summary, 1903, pp. 16-17. (c) Idem, 1904, pp. 16-17. (d) Idem, 1905, pp. 16-17. The average rainfall for six years at Bishop, Inyo County, was 3.64 inches; at Camp Cady, on Mohave river an average of 3.08 inches for two years is recorded. Daggett, San Bernardino County, had an average of 4 inches for three years. At Yuma, Ariz., a twenty-eight year record gives an average of 3.16 inches. It is probably safe to say that the normal rainfall for the desert is between 3 and 4 inches annually, but this average is derived from annual extremes ranging from seasons of no rainfall to those having as much as 10 inches. WATER SUPPLY. ORIGIN. A portion of the rainfall in this region is carried off by evaporation as soon as it falls; another portion soon sinks and joins the ground water, which permanently saturates the rocks below a certain level; still another portion finds its way directly to the streams, which carry it to sinks or lakes to be again evaporated. The moisture that has been evaporated from the surface of the Pacific to float inland as vapor and be condensed again to water the earth is the original source from which practically all of the meager supply of the desert comes, but this does not mean that each spring is dependent on the rainfall in the region immediately around it. Many of the springs of the desert are of deep origin and are not fed by local rains, and the waters that supply them fall on mountains far from the points where they issue. RIVERS. Only four of the streams that flow toward the Great basin from the Sierra Nevada and Sierra Madre extend beyond the base of the mountains. The others sink at once into the sands of the desert.

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