page 32

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page 32
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http://digital.library.unlv.edu/u?/dig,8
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from the springs of both groups is of good quality, and there is a sufficient quantity, if developed and conserved, to irrigate several acres. 8. Rest Spring and Burro Spring, Inyo County (C-3).—Rest Spring is in a shallow gulch at the head of a canyon draining southward and westward into Butte Valley. It is one-half mile west of the summit of the Panamint Range and 15 miles north of Goldbelt Spring (No. 15), to which there is a plain trail. It is 6 1/2 miles south of Tin Mountain, the northernmost peak of the range. The flow is about 3 barrels of water daily. A trail running due north leads to Burro Spring, 1 1/2 miles distant. This spring is in a shallow gulch at the head of a canyon draining southward and eastward into Death Valley, one-fourth of a mile east of the divide. This spring also yields about 3 barrels of good water per day. 9. Mesquite Spring, Inyo County (C-4).-—This spring is in the east bank of the wash in Death Valley, one-half mile from the bottom. It is 6 miles southwest of Staininger's ranch, 19 miles southeast of Sand Springs, and 11 miles northwest of the locality known as Lost Wagons. There are other springs in the desert portion of California and Nevada that are also known as "Mesquite " springs. 10. Indian Springs, Inyo County (C-4).-—Like "Mesquite," the name " Indian " is applied to several desert springs. Those here referred to are near the northeast end of the great Panamint Range and near the south end and west side of Termination Valley on an old and little-used trail that runs southward from Lida, Nev., by way of Sand Springs to the north end of Death Valley. They are marked by remains of Indian tepees. There are said to be other springs in this vicinity, but their location is unknown except to local prospectors. 11. Tule Spring, Inyo County (C-5).—This spring is about 3 miles south of west, air line, from Willow Spring (No. 12) and 12 miles southwest of Bullfrog, Nev. It is on the north side of the east branch of a canyon at the foot of a cliff, 1 3/4 miles southeast of the high, sharp, rocky Thimble Peak. It is about 500 yards east of the trail from Bullfrog to Surveyors' Well (No. 18) by way of Willow Spring (No. 12). There is a very small quantity of excellent water. There is another Tule Spring to the southeast, near Tecopa. 12. Willow Spring, Inyo County (C-5).—This spring is on the east slope of the Grapevine Range, 9 miles southwest of Bullfrog, Nev., and 3 miles north of the Boundary Canyon road at the pass. The flow is 10 barrels of good water daily. There are at least 8 watering places in the desert region with which this paper deals that are known as Willow Spring or Willow Springs; so this is by no means a determinate name.

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