page 40

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page 40
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http://digital.library.unlv.edu/u?/dig,8
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the south end of the Resting Springs Mountains. The waters well up from sandstone and are clear and wholesome. The Lee ranch is about 8 miles east of Zabriskie, a station on the Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad. There are wagon roads to these springs from the east by way of Ivanpah, on the Santa Fe Railway, and thence northward to Sandy; or from Jean, Nev., on the Salt Lake road, westward to Sandy. At Sandy travelers can procure hay, grain, and other supplies. From Sandy the best route is northward by way of Manse where directions may be obtained for going to Resting Springs, about 35 miles to the southwest. There is also a road from Stump Spring directly west to Resting Springs, but it is rocky, and because of the drifting sands is apt to be dim and not easily followed. There is an old trail from Sandy to Horsethief Spring (No. 79), thence along the north edge of the Kingston Mountains to Tecopa, and on to these springs, but it is unwise to attempt to follow this road without an experienced guide. From Resting Springs a road runs westward across Resting Springs Dry Lake to the buildings of the old Amargosa Borax Company. There one road turns southward by way of the Ibex mine to Saratoga Springs, and another turns northward to the head of Furnace Creek. Formerly no water was procurable along the latter route between Resting Springs and Coleman, a distance of 50 miles, but conditions have been altered since the Greenwater mining camp was established. The old San Bernardino and Salt Lake emigrant road passes these springs and goes through Emigrant Pass, just north of the ranch, and thence eastward by way of Stump Spring to Las Vegas. In the days of the old "Spanish trail " these springs were known as the Archilette. J. C. Fremont camped by them April 29, 1844, and named them "Agua de Hernandez," for the survivor of a party of emigrants who were murdered there. Fremont rescued Hernandez and buried his companions. He described the place as "a grassy spot, with springs and bushes, which make a camping place." 52. China ranch, Inyo County (G-7).—China ranch, elevation 1,357 feet, also known as Morrison ranch and Willow Creek ranch, is on the main road from Daggett to Resting Springs. On leaving Cave Springs (No. 73) and passing down the north side of the Avawatz Mountains into the bottom of Death Valley, the road branches, one fork turning to the northwest, to Saratoga Springs (No. 74), and the other continuing a little east of north, across the flat, and to China ranch. This road is frequently obscure, as it is not often traveled and the sand drifts over it. Nearly all travelers go to Saratoga Springs and stay there over night, as the road across Death Valley is very sandy. It is about 30 miles to China ranch from Cave Springs direct, and

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