page 44

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page 44
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http://digital.library.unlv.edu/u?/dig,8
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65. Lone Willow Spring, San Bernardino County (H-4).—This spring has long been known to desert travelers, as it is the first watering place north of Granite Wells (No. 96) on the road to Panamint Valley. It is about 25 miles north and a little east of Granite Wells. The spring is in a canyon in the pass between the Slate Range and Brown Mountain. It was at one time one of the stations for the "20-mule teams " hauling borax from Death Valley to Mohave, and the site of the station is indicated by old troughs and by the pipe that carries the water, whose quality is excellent, from the springs to the road. The spring was named from a lone willow that once stood near it. A short distance north of it the road branches, the eastern branch leading to the sink of Death Valley. There is no water on this road for about 38 miles, until Bennet's Wells are reached, but water may be obtained at mining camps at several points on the northern road, which leads to Ballarat. 66. Hidden Springs, San Bernardino County (H-5).—These springs are near the crest of the Quail Mountains, a range about 12 miles long, lying east of Brown Mountain and north of Leach Mountain. The springs are on trails known only to prospectors. They are found by following the trails of wild burros that go to them to drink. 67. Quail Springs, San Bernardino County (H-5).—These small springs are also in the Quail Mountains, almost due north of Leach's Spring (No. 69). They are high up in the range, away from all roads and trails, and are visited only by prospectors. The water is cold and good. They should not be confused with No. 62, which is another group of small springs of the same name, about 35 miles to the west. 68. Fourth of July Springs, San Bernardino County (H-5).—These form the third group of springs reported to exist in Quail Mountains. They are on the north side of the range, about 7 miles north of Leach's Spring. There is no road and no well-defined trail to them, but it is said that prospectors are able to get water for themselves and their pack animals here. 69. Leach's Spring, San Bernardino County (H-5).—Leach's Spring (elevation about 3,534 feet) is one of the most important camping places on the road from Randsburg to South Death Valley and to points in Nevada by way of Saratoga Springs to Resting Springs, and its water is the best to be found between Saratoga Springs and Granite Wells. Travelers are advised to make a dry camp for one night between Granite Wells and Leach's Spring. In approaching the spring from the west one ascends a steep grade through deep sand, where teams often have to double for 3 miles or more. When the summit of this grade is reached a plain road is seen leading to the right— that is, to the south—into the mountains. This road ascends steeply nearly to the main summit. At the foot of the granite pinnacles that form the axis of the range there are a few acres covered with camp

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