page 59

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page 59
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http://digital.library.unlv.edu/u?/dig,8
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127. Well, San Bernardino County (J-5).—This well is at the southwest end of Coolgardie Lake, the easternmost of the three dry hikes in this township. It is by the side of the road to Copper City and is readily found. The well is dug in the playa deposits and the water is of fair quality, being only slightly brackish. 128. Indian Spring, San Bernardino County (J-5).—This spring is about 12 miles north of Kane's Wells (No. 129) and about 4 miles north of some dry-placer mines. A road leads northward to it from Kane's Wells and thence westward by way of Coolgardie Dry Lake to Copper City, but it is a road over which there is but little travel. The spring is utilized by miners who work the dry gold placers of that region. The water is better than that along the dry lakes to the southwest, as it flows from granite. Another Indian Spring (No. 150) lies about 75 miles westward, near Rosamond Station, on the Southern Pacific Railroad. 129. Kane's Wells, San Bernardino County (J-5).—These wells (Pl. III, A) are about 22 miles north of Barstow on the road to Coolgardie and Copper City. After leaving Barstow the road crosses two divides, and a short distance beyond the second divide turns northeastward to the head of a little canyon that runs eastward. Kane's stamp mill and wells are about one-fourth mile down this canyon and can not be seen by the traveler until he is near the house and the mill. There are two good wells here, both boarded up and supplied with pumps. On looking down the canyon from the mill the traveler may see Coyote Dry Lake in the desert below, but to reach this lake or to go northward he should return to the head of the canyon. The main road leads northward from this point past the placer camps to Indian Spring and Copper City; the middle road at the summit leads northwestward to Coolgardie, about 7 miles distant. On continuing northward and following the crest of the divide on the easternmost trail, the traveler will find a road that turns eastward down the canyon. This road leads to Coyote Dry Lake. On the main Copper City road to the north, beyond the dry placer works, another road turns off toward the east, running to Paradise Springs (No. 130), but it was so badly washed out by cloud-bursts in 1905 as to make these springs difficult to find. Kane Springs (No. 84) lie west of Randsburg, while Kane's Spring (No. 176) is about 9 miles southeast of Newberry Station. 130. Paradise Springs, San Bernardino County (J-5).—Paradise Springs are a favorite stopping place with prospectors who know the way to them, as there is generally sufficient grass around them to afford good grazing. The best way to reach them from Kane's Wells is to follow the road from that place directly north for about 3

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