Transcript of interview with Faye Duncan Daniel by Claytee D. White, October 18, 1996

Metadata

Digital ID
ohr000034
Title
Transcript of interview with Faye Duncan Daniel by Claytee D. White, October 18, 1996
Narrator
Material Set
Interviewer
White, Claytee D.
Description
Interview with Faye Duncan Daniel conducted by Claytee D. White on October 18, 1996. Beginning in clerical work at the Nevada Test Site, Daniel rose to become the Assistant Hotel Manager at Union Plaza Hotel and Casino. She established the Hotel Managers Association and the Professional Black Women's Alliance. After leaving the gaming industry, Daniel returned to school to train for a career in education. She worked closely with the Displaced Homemaker Program at the Community College of Southern Nevada and later with Help Centers of Southern Nevada.
Abstract
Faye Duncan Daniel's narrative illustrates the goals, strategies and perseverance required of African American women to move through the ranks to management positions in the Las Vegas gaming industry. Daniel's motivation to change her life came in 1965 when, she recalled, "Living in a trailer and having my husband called a porter prompted me to go to school." She attended adult education classes in the evening until she completed all the requirements for her high school diploma. She continued classes until she acquired skills necessary to obtain a well-paying job. Education was not her only hurdle, however. From her first job as a clerical worker at the Nevada Test Site to a position supervisor at the Union Plaza Hotel & Casino, she overcame barriers associated with her race and gender. Daniel did not retreat but combined perseverance and networking with direct confrontations to racism. She eventually became Assistant Hotel Manager at the Union Plaza. During those years she established the Hotel Managers Association and the Professional Black Women's Alliance. After leaving the gaming industry Daniel returned to school to train for a different career. She worked closely with the Displaced Homemaker Program at the Community College of Southern Nevada and later, with Help Centers of Southern Nevada. Currently enrolled in a master's program at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Daniel looks forward to a career as an educator. Daniel's narrative contributes important insights about the nature of race relations in Las Vegas following World War II. It illustrated how African Americans used support and networking to obtain economic goals once racial barriers began to crumble.
Identified Individuals
Identified Corporate Bodies
Neighborhood City / Town
Source
F850.N4 D36 1998
Original Collection
Original Date (interview)
1996-10-18
Subject (FAST)
DC Type
Genre (TGM)
Specific Genre (LCSH)
Language
Rights
This material may be protected by copyright. Personal, including educational and academic, use of this material is without restriction; but acknowledgement of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, University Libraries is requested whether the use is oral, web or in print. Commercial use of any portion of this material requires permission. For further information please contact Digital Collections: http://digital.library.unlv.edu/contact. This document is an oral history. It is a spoken account of certain events and phenomena recorded at one particular moment and filtered through one individual's life experience, sensibility, and memory. As such, it should be considered a primary source rather than a final, verified, or complete narrative of the events it records.
Digital Publisher
University of Nevada Las Vegas
Digital Collection
Master Extent
2421 x 3153 pixels; 8.1 x 10.5 inches; 23,209,407 bytes; 72 images
Master File Format
Master File Quality
24 bit color; 300 ppi

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