University of Nevada, Las Vegas

A Lady in Boomtown: Miners and Manners on the Nevada Frontier - Page 107

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“ And you’re in with ‘ em,” he roared. “ I’ll kill ya’.” Fred gazed at the man with his customary jovial smile, but made no move and said quietly, “ Okay. First, let’s go down and have a drink.” The blazing eyes softened to sheepish embarrassment. Slowly the man lowered the pick and muttered, “ Okay.” The lawyer rose, put his arm over the man’s shoulder, and they clattered down the stairs to the saloon. Over a few drinks they swapped yarns until Fred was able to signal the bartender. Presently the sheriff drifted into the saloon and enticed the man into his custody. When I heard Fred tell this story, another lawyer was present. “ Fred,” he said, “ I think it was kinda sneakin’ of ya to talk that man out of killin’ ya.” Distinctions continued to flow toward my husband. Governors of both Nevada and California repeatedly appointed him to the Commission on Uniform State Laws. In 1920 he was asked by Herbert Hoover to second the nomination of Mr. Hoover at the Republican National Convention, but much to our chagrin, the dark horse, Warren G. Harding, was nominated instead. From the beginning of Hugh’s active association with the American Bar, he had talked “ session in San Francisco.” Finally, through his efforts, the executive committee accepted the invitation of the California Bar for the 1922 convention. Hugh decided this was our opportunity to repay the great debt of hospitality we owed to our eastern friends. A special train would be made up in Chicago to bring conferees to San Francisco, so it would be a simple matter to arrange a day’s stopover at Truckee for a side trip to Lake Tahoe. In order to distinguish out guests - almost a hundred people - each person was given a sprig of sagebrush ( which I had brought from Tonopah) as he stepped off the train. With this insignia, everything was at his disposal - golf, swimming, drinks, smokes. For lunch we served mountain trout or prairie chicken, and in the afternoon a big chartered launch took our guests for a tour of the lake. As the sun was going down, reflected in the opalescent water, everyone returned to the train, and San Francisco. In 1920 Hugh’s name had been one of four placed in nomination for the presidency of the American Bar, the first time any western lawyer had been so considered. Also when a vacancy occurred on the Supreme Court of the United States, Hugh’s friends in Nevada joined a host of fellow members of the American Bar Association in presenting his name to President Harding as a candidate. The letters of endorsement from almost every state, together with

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A Lady in Boomtown: Miners and Manners on the Nevada Frontier - Page 107
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